The Necessity of Preaching

—January of 1996

The Necessity of Preaching

Preaching is indispensable to Christianity.  To set aside preaching would be to close the mouth and sever the legs of the Christian religion.  Preaching has been central to the ministry of the Church historically, and especially so to those in the holiness tradition.  The holiness movement has produced and profited from some of the greatest expositors and pulpiteers of this century.  So why has the standard of preaching in the contemporary holiness church become so deplorable?  Why are our finest preacher boys finding their heroes among popular Calvinistic communicators?  Why are our parishioners turning to self-help counselors and psychologists rather than to faithful men of God for answers to life’s perplexing problems?

Much of the current uncertainty about preaching is due to a generation of preachers who have lost confidence in the Word of God.  Too often the contemporary preacher uses the Bible as a curiosity shop.  He peruses through it until some palatable proof text emerges as a snappy sound bite on which to tack his latest self-help lecture.  These pulpit vagabonds fail to see that Scripture is the omnipotence of God unleashed through the spoken word, and that it holds the answers to life’s most desperate needs.  When preached and responded to, it will radically change lives.

The art of preaching is further brought into scorn by preachers who have caved in to today’s culture.  Ours is a culture that demeans the personal disciplines necessary to become an effective preacher.  The ability to build bridges from the Word of God to contemporary life takes an unbelievable amount of hard work and study.  A man who snubs through study will be doomed to mediocrity and ambiguity.  Too many holiness pulpits lack a clear, definite, certain sound that is forged only on the anvil of study.  So many church-goers are like the small girl wearied by empty utterances.  She appealed, “Mother, pay the man, and let us go home.”

However, study alone isn’t the answer.  Scholarship that isn’t steeped in prayer will yield barrenness.  The preacher who allows day after day of prayerlessness to prevail in his heart need expect no grapes of Eschol to hang over the wall of his preaching on Sunday morning.

I have a major concern that today’s holiness pulpit suffers from a “lack of history.”  Eugene Sterner, in his book Vital Christianity, wisely comments, “Clocks are corrected by astronomy.  What good is a clock if it is not set by the stars?  Without a sense of eternity [and history] you don’t even know what time it is.”  The preacher who fails to understand his roots and properly appreciate his heritage is usually condemned to repeat its mistakes.  Some view their heritage as a bothersome bundle of historical baggage burdening them down.  They exaggerate the mistakes and eccentricities of yesterday’s pulpiteers in order to nullify the claims of their legacy, much like the adolescent craving freedom from restraint seeks to repudiate his father.

The effective preacher, without making the past a hitching post, does own his heritage, embraces it with gratitude, incorporates it into his identity, and utilizes it to the fullest in communicating eternal truth that rings with clarity.

Preaching is here to stay!  Men who join hands with God and preach with certainty will find that through their labors God will advance His kingdom.

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